Saturday, July 25, 2009

New Study Shows...



This rough digital painting is based on new scientific evidence showing that some dinosaurs were friendly, and looked the part. [citation needed] A few prehistoric reptiles showed a "kind demeanor" and "gentle disposition" which was often confused for lack of intelligence. I mean, who could be scared of this guy?

For over three weeks I've been wanting to play with my new Intuos 4 pad (which underwent neat design changes by Wacom since my December post). It's difficult for me to use the tablet when drawing directly into the computer, but it is great for digital painting. The buttons are now on one side and the pad is ambidextrous.

Oh and the painting program was Photoshop. The layers can be seen below.


video

13 comments:

dBurk said...

Hey Anthony. Nice work!! How do you like digital work compared to traditional? I experiemented with it in the past (tablet and all) but couldn't get past the disconnection of the "drawing utensil" and the canvas (computer monitor). Anyway, looking really good - as always!
dB

Anthony VanArsdale said...

Hi David, thanks! The pen and tablet do take some getting used to. The medium is a fast one and produces some pretty neat effects so I hope I adjust well to it. Only time will tell.

I just started another small piece and it has it's share of frustrations. When working on the dinosaur in this post, I had to start over once.

Carla said...

That was an awesome illustration, A.V.

What is the difference between a program like Photoshop and Inkscape?

Carla.

Anthony VanArsdale said...

Thanks Carla!

I'm not too familiar with Inkscape, but it appears to be a vector program where the art is line drawn. Photoshop deals with raster images like photographs. Images created in Inkscape or Adobe Illustrator can be enlarged to any size, whereas Photoshop images must have a high resolution to be reproduced in a large format.

Jennifer said...

Looks great Anthony!

Anthony VanArsdale said...

Thanks Jennifer! although I don't think my use of color is very good... he came out so green

Jennifer said...

Hey Anthony, one of my professors taught me to look through a bunch of illustrations you like with there color pallets and steal their colors, do a few color studies and then pick that one illustration and just use the colors from it. It's not stealing the art, it's just using someones pallet that may have a little more professional pallet use. Then after a while it helps you know what color combos work *but I still take colors!

Jennifer said...

"their" not there

Anthony VanArsdale said...

That's a great idea! I've recently been studying some of Wyeth's work, and Mead Schaeffer's. Very addicted to the colors they used. Something I've struggled with has been trusting too much to memory... from now on, no more doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results. :)

Joe Sutphin said...

looks cool Anthony. i have a Cintiq at work but i dont use it much anymore.

Anthony VanArsdale said...

Thanks Joe! I just posted another intuos painting over at the Catholic Illustrator's Guild:

http://smallpax.blogspot.com/2009/07/saint-ignatius-of-loyola.html

I'm hoping that this digital work will help me in my traditional oil paints. If not in the application, at least in providing some nice color roughs to go by.

Ambera said...

Hi Anthony!
Thanks for all these nice comments you've been leaving on my clouds lately, I appreciate the feedback so much!!
These new digital paintings are interesting, I see a lot of illustrators experimenting with this new medium, yours look terrific!
Do you miss the physicality of a brush?

Anthony VanArsdale said...

Thank you so much, Ambera!
I do miss it. Nothing can replace the physicality of a brush, AND the beauty of an original. But for commercial use, it is a marvel!